Hallstatt, Guangdong, PR China

When developers in the People’s Republic of China revealed their replica of the Austrian town of Hallstatt [Wikipedia] they got a lot of attention [Spiegel International] [Reuters] [China Daily], from abroad at least. The act reaffirmed common stereotypes, ranging from Chinese being notorious copycats, their love for kitsch and gigantomania. What made it worse is that Europeans generally have an inexplicable pride for their national treasures, while at the same time being a little bit insecure about whether they should be. After all, many of these places have been created hundreds of years ago.

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On Population Density

天水圍 Tin Shui Wai, the City of Sorrow. This government housing estate, developed in 1987 is home to over 270,000 low-income individuals. It lies exactly opposite of 深圳 Shenzhen in Mainland China and about 1 hour bus ride away from Central.

天水圍 Tin Shui Wai, the City of Sorrow. This government housing estate, developed in 1987 is home to over 270,000 low-income individuals. It lies exactly opposite of 深圳 Shenzhen in Mainland China and about 1 hour bus ride away from Central.

Visitors to the Fragrant Harbor are not unusually stunned by the large skyscrapers jostling along a tiny strip of land north of a massive rock covered in thick forests. What people usually see of Kowloon is the tiny and busy streets of 油尖旺 Tsim Yau Mong, the area compromising everything between TST and Prince Edward. It seems that Hong Kong must be the most crowded place on earth, and collapse bound to happen. This impression, however is wrong,

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Overnight Getaway – The Concrete Forts of 開平 Kaiping

On the other side of the Pearl River Delta lies a place that tells remarkable stories about American-Chinese immigration, dreams of trade and entrepreneurship and the desire to be accepted. It is just a short trip away from Hong Kong and will leave you plenty of opportunities to enjoy your calm green short trip that you so much deserve.

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Is it Legal?

The blog Big Lychee sums it up here here and here: If you don’t have an illegal structure in your home, there is something wrong with you. Maybe you have something to hide that you go through the painful and impossible process to legalize your amendments? Maybe you prepare for the long and slimy process of becoming Chief Executive Looter? Maybe you don’t actually live in Hong Kong, but bought your estate just for money laundering?
There is something seriously wrong with the way Hong Kong handles it’s building licensing. Though in effect Hong Kong has probably the most liberal and non-interventionist policy towards construction, everyone in Hong Kong is a criminal in the eyes of the authorities.
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